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Middle TN Permaculture Design Courses in Spring and Fall

Wed, 04/01/2015 - 15:28
Earn your Permaculture Design Certification during this 12 day course that integrates real-world design, and homestead skill building.
Two PDC's being offered this year. One in spring May 22-June 2, 2015 and one in fall September 18-29, 2015.


Early bird discounts and group discounts available. Three meals per day plus camping is included in the price.

Spiral Ridge Permaculture's lead instructors, Cliff Davis and Jennifer Albanese have been practicing permaculture for over 14 years and teaching for over 10. We have been trained by and taught with, top notch instructors and have mentored hundreds of students in beginning and advanced design. We are particularly familiar with southern temperate systems and we are consistently living the permaculture life on an off-grid homestead/small farm and by working professionally as designers. We also have a great line up of guest instructors.

Learn to improve efficiency and synergy between elements in your landscape.

Generate an inspired vision for your landscape.

Increase the yields and resilience of your backyard, homestead or farm.

Learn to create and implement a design from site analysis to completion.

Discover the secrets for rapid creation of healthy, and biologically active topsoil.

Plan for whole landscape water harvesting for your property.

Reduce costs and dependency on outside energy inputs, increase profits, and enhance livelihoods while improving your quality of life.

Create resilience and security for your family and your local community.

Contribute to the regeneration of land, water, and air quality to improve the health and wellbeing of the environment and it’s inhabitants.

Think in whole systems, rather than in parts, to understand and enhance the relationships between those parts. Whole systems thinking is a methodology that leads to successful problem solving because it mimics the behavior of natural systems.

More info at: http://www.spiralridgepermaculture.com/

Middle TN Permaculture Design Courses in Spring and Fall

Wed, 04/01/2015 - 15:28
Earn your Permaculture Design Certification during this 12 day course that integrates real-world design, and homestead skill building.
Two PDC's being offered this year. One in spring May 22-June 2, 2015 and one in fall September 18-29, 2015.


Early bird discounts and group discounts available. Three meals per day plus camping is included in the price.

Spiral Ridge Permaculture's lead instructors, Cliff Davis and Jennifer Albanese have been practicing permaculture for over 14 years and teaching for over 10. We have been trained by and taught with, top notch instructors and have mentored hundreds of students in beginning and advanced design. We are particularly familiar with southern temperate systems and we are consistently living the permaculture life on an off-grid homestead/small farm and by working professionally as designers. We also have a great line up of guest instructors.

Learn to improve efficiency and synergy between elements in your landscape.

Generate an inspired vision for your landscape.

Increase the yields and resilience of your backyard, homestead or farm.

Learn to create and implement a design from site analysis to completion.

Discover the secrets for rapid creation of healthy, and biologically active topsoil.

Plan for whole landscape water harvesting for your property.

Reduce costs and dependency on outside energy inputs, increase profits, and enhance livelihoods while improving your quality of life.

Create resilience and security for your family and your local community.

Contribute to the regeneration of land, water, and air quality to improve the health and wellbeing of the environment and it’s inhabitants.

Think in whole systems, rather than in parts, to understand and enhance the relationships between those parts. Whole systems thinking is a methodology that leads to successful problem solving because it mimics the behavior of natural systems.

More info at: http://www.spiralridgepermaculture.com/

Middle TN Permaculture Design Courses in Spring and Fall

Wed, 04/01/2015 - 15:28
Earn your Permaculture Design Certification during this 12 day course that integrates real-world design, and homestead skill building.
Two PDC's being offered this year. One in spring May 22-June 2, 2015 and one in fall September 18-29, 2015.


Early bird discounts and group discounts available. Three meals per day plus camping is included in the price.

Spiral Ridge Permaculture's lead instructors, Cliff Davis and Jennifer Albanese have been practicing permaculture for over 14 years and teaching for over 10. We have been trained by and taught with, top notch instructors and have mentored hundreds of students in beginning and advanced design. We are particularly familiar with southern temperate systems and we are consistently living the permaculture life on an off-grid homestead/small farm and by working professionally as designers. We also have a great line up of guest instructors.

Learn to improve efficiency and synergy between elements in your landscape.

Generate an inspired vision for your landscape.

Increase the yields and resilience of your backyard, homestead or farm.

Learn to create and implement a design from site analysis to completion.

Discover the secrets for rapid creation of healthy, and biologically active topsoil.

Plan for whole landscape water harvesting for your property.

Reduce costs and dependency on outside energy inputs, increase profits, and enhance livelihoods while improving your quality of life.

Create resilience and security for your family and your local community.

Contribute to the regeneration of land, water, and air quality to improve the health and wellbeing of the environment and it’s inhabitants.

Think in whole systems, rather than in parts, to understand and enhance the relationships between those parts. Whole systems thinking is a methodology that leads to successful problem solving because it mimics the behavior of natural systems.

More info at: http://www.spiralridgepermaculture.com/

Chattanooga TN - Scrub land wanted

Sat, 02/14/2015 - 18:03
I might be leaving Atl to move to Chattanooga in the next month or two for a new job. Now that I'm escaping the city, I'd love to really get back to the country. I'm looking for land to rent. If you also have housing with utilities that would be a plus. Otherwise I'll just buy a cheap RV/camper. I do need access to potable water though.

Hear are my needs (deal breakers):
- within 20 minutes of Chattanooga (30-40 minutes including morning traffic)
- at least 10 acres. I'll take less (5+ acres) if it is part of a larger farm. I just want to make sure I have plenty of space between me and the nearest neighbor.

Here are my wants (nice to have but not a deal breaker):
- Easy going neighbors
- unused barn
- livestock trailer and truck to move it with that they would let me borrow a half dozen times a year
- rights to cut up downed trees if able to heat with wood.
- If you already have internet in place that would be HUGE since I may need to work from home on occasion
- rights to hunt on the property

I'm going to try my hand running goats, pigs, chickens and ducks in a mob grazing set up. Possibly other small livestock. I'd actually prefer neglected, overgrown land that you haven't been able to do anything with. I would get cheaper rent and the experience of clearing land with animals. You would get your neglected land restored. win/win.

I have two dogs (GSD and pit/boxer mix) that are moving with me. Both are really sweet and friendly. One must be kept outside when I'm not home due to separation anxiety (she tears up the house if no one is home). Other than that, no problems with either of them.

I'd consider a lease to own arrangement. Assuming this is successful, I want to buy some land in the future. I'd consider buying a little at first (5-10 acres) and adding on to it over time. For anyone that isn't quite ready to sell the family farm but plans to in the future this could be a great opportunity.

Chattanooga TN - Scrub land wanted

Sat, 02/14/2015 - 18:03
I might be leaving Atl to move to Chattanooga in the next month or two for a new job. Now that I'm escaping the city, I'd love to really get back to the country. I'm looking for land to rent. If you also have housing with utilities that would be a plus. Otherwise I'll just buy a cheap RV/camper. I do need access to potable water though.

Hear are my needs (deal breakers):
- within 20 minutes of Chattanooga (30-40 minutes including morning traffic)
- at least 10 acres. I'll take less (5+ acres) if it is part of a larger farm. I just want to make sure I have plenty of space between me and the nearest neighbor.

Here are my wants (nice to have but not a deal breaker):
- Easy going neighbors
- unused barn
- livestock trailer and truck to move it with that they would let me borrow a half dozen times a year
- rights to cut up downed trees if able to heat with wood.
- If you already have internet in place that would be HUGE since I may need to work from home on occasion
- rights to hunt on the property

I'm going to try my hand running goats, pigs, chickens and ducks in a mob grazing set up. Possibly other small livestock. I'd actually prefer neglected, overgrown land that you haven't been able to do anything with. I would get cheaper rent and the experience of clearing land with animals. You would get your neglected land restored. win/win.

I have two dogs (GSD and pit/boxer mix) that are moving with me. Both are really sweet and friendly. One must be kept outside when I'm not home due to separation anxiety (she tears up the house if no one is home). Other than that, no problems with either of them.

I'd consider a lease to own arrangement. Assuming this is successful, I want to buy some land in the future. I'd consider buying a little at first (5-10 acres) and adding on to it over time. For anyone that isn't quite ready to sell the family farm but plans to in the future this could be a great opportunity.

Chattanooga TN - Scrub land wanted

Sat, 02/14/2015 - 18:03
I might be leaving Atl to move to Chattanooga in the next month or two for a new job. Now that I'm escaping the city, I'd love to really get back to the country. I'm looking for land to rent. If you also have housing with utilities that would be a plus. Otherwise I'll just buy a cheap RV/camper. I do need access to potable water though.

Hear are my needs (deal breakers):
- within 20 minutes of Chattanooga (30-40 minutes including morning traffic)
- at least 10 acres. I'll take less (5+ acres) if it is part of a larger farm. I just want to make sure I have plenty of space between me and the nearest neighbor.

Here are my wants (nice to have but not a deal breaker):
- Easy going neighbors
- unused barn
- livestock trailer and truck to move it with that they would let me borrow a half dozen times a year
- rights to cut up downed trees if able to heat with wood.
- If you already have internet in place that would be HUGE since I may need to work from home on occasion
- rights to hunt on the property

I'm going to try my hand running goats, pigs, chickens and ducks in a mob grazing set up. Possibly other small livestock. I'd actually prefer neglected, overgrown land that you haven't been able to do anything with. I would get cheaper rent and the experience of clearing land with animals. You would get your neglected land restored. win/win.

I have two dogs (GSD and pit/boxer mix) that are moving with me. Both are really sweet and friendly. One must be kept outside when I'm not home due to separation anxiety (she tears up the house if no one is home). Other than that, no problems with either of them.

I'd consider a lease to own arrangement. Assuming this is successful, I want to buy some land in the future. I'd consider buying a little at first (5-10 acres) and adding on to it over time. For anyone that isn't quite ready to sell the family farm but plans to in the future this could be a great opportunity.

Canadian permies looking for places to visit/stay near Memphis/Nashville??

Sat, 02/14/2015 - 10:35
Hi Everyone,

My partner and I are planning to take the train from Montana to Tennessee in June of this year, with the intention of getting married. We'd love to stay at farms or permaculture sites in the area. Not looking for free stays, just good suggestions from locals!

Thank you!!

Canadian permies looking for places to visit/stay near Memphis/Nashville??

Sat, 02/14/2015 - 10:35
Hi Everyone,

My partner and I are planning to take the train from Montana to Tennessee in June of this year, with the intention of getting married. We'd love to stay at farms or permaculture sites in the area. Not looking for free stays, just good suggestions from locals!

Thank you!!

Canadian permies looking for places to visit/stay near Memphis/Nashville??

Sat, 02/14/2015 - 10:35
Hi Everyone,

My partner and I are planning to take the train from Montana to Tennessee in June of this year, with the intention of getting married. We'd love to stay at farms or permaculture sites in the area. Not looking for free stays, just good suggestions from locals!

Thank you!!

What could I do with steep, forrested, mountain land in WNC?

Wed, 01/28/2015 - 11:10
I'd ideally like to purchase about 10 acres of land to start our homestead on. I can live with anything +/- 5 acres easily enough I think. I'd like to be within about an hour of Asheville, NC.

I've been looking at land for months, and the only land that's remotely cheap is the side of a mountain. Looking at Google Earth and placing paths on the land I've found shows slopes from 30% to 50% being pretty normal for anything I can find in my price range. Geoff Lawton says that anything over about 23% should terraced, which is expensive, and requires high skill level to do right. I'm not sure I've got the skill or money to do that right now, and I also think that the costs to do that will put me into the price range of gentler land anyway. I could do the terraces over time, a little at a time, but I'd really rather avoid it to be honest.

Other than terracing, is there any other way to put steep land into a more productive state without spending a fortune?

I've tried looking at much smaller plots, from 1-2 acres, since it's better than a suburban lot, but once you get that small, the cost/acre goes up so fast that it's about the same price as buying 10 acres, but with 9 to 9 1/2 acres being the side of a mountain, and still only getting maybe 1/2 to 1 acre flat enough to easily do anything. I'm kind of thinking that I'd just as soon buy 10 acres with 1 acre flat enough to use, and at least have some buffer to the neighbors, but I would still prefer to put it into some kind of productive use one day.

Anyone have any thoughts/suggestions on what could be done?

What could I do with steep, forrested, mountain land in WNC?

Wed, 01/28/2015 - 11:10
I'd ideally like to purchase about 10 acres of land to start our homestead on. I can live with anything +/- 5 acres easily enough I think. I'd like to be within about an hour of Asheville, NC.

I've been looking at land for months, and the only land that's remotely cheap is the side of a mountain. Looking at Google Earth and placing paths on the land I've found shows slopes from 30% to 50% being pretty normal for anything I can find in my price range. Geoff Lawton says that anything over about 23% should terraced, which is expensive, and requires high skill level to do right. I'm not sure I've got the skill or money to do that right now, and I also think that the costs to do that will put me into the price range of gentler land anyway. I could do the terraces over time, a little at a time, but I'd really rather avoid it to be honest.

Other than terracing, is there any other way to put steep land into a more productive state without spending a fortune?

I've tried looking at much smaller plots, from 1-2 acres, since it's better than a suburban lot, but once you get that small, the cost/acre goes up so fast that it's about the same price as buying 10 acres, but with 9 to 9 1/2 acres being the side of a mountain, and still only getting maybe 1/2 to 1 acre flat enough to easily do anything. I'm kind of thinking that I'd just as soon buy 10 acres with 1 acre flat enough to use, and at least have some buffer to the neighbors, but I would still prefer to put it into some kind of productive use one day.

Anyone have any thoughts/suggestions on what could be done?

What could I do with steep, forrested, mountain land in WNC?

Wed, 01/28/2015 - 11:10
I'd ideally like to purchase about 10 acres of land to start our homestead on. I can live with anything +/- 5 acres easily enough I think. I'd like to be within about an hour of Asheville, NC.

I've been looking at land for months, and the only land that's remotely cheap is the side of a mountain. Looking at Google Earth and placing paths on the land I've found shows slopes from 30% to 50% being pretty normal for anything I can find in my price range. Geoff Lawton says that anything over about 23% should terraced, which is expensive, and requires high skill level to do right. I'm not sure I've got the skill or money to do that right now, and I also think that the costs to do that will put me into the price range of gentler land anyway. I could do the terraces over time, a little at a time, but I'd really rather avoid it to be honest.

Other than terracing, is there any other way to put steep land into a more productive state without spending a fortune?

I've tried looking at much smaller plots, from 1-2 acres, since it's better than a suburban lot, but once you get that small, the cost/acre goes up so fast that it's about the same price as buying 10 acres, but with 9 to 9 1/2 acres being the side of a mountain, and still only getting maybe 1/2 to 1 acre flat enough to easily do anything. I'm kind of thinking that I'd just as soon buy 10 acres with 1 acre flat enough to use, and at least have some buffer to the neighbors, but I would still prefer to put it into some kind of productive use one day.

Anyone have any thoughts/suggestions on what could be done?

Hugel/swale technique for fruit orchard with pigs in the understory

Thu, 01/01/2015 - 10:03
Hello,
A first post here. First an intro, then a plan summary, then a question. We have a small homestead (7 acres) that we have a cider orchard started on (Don't Quit Yer Day Job Orchard) and are finishing our house. What fun to raise children, build a house and try to farm at the same time. Really though we are blessed with all of it. We have several acres on a sloping hillside that was logged about fifteen years ago. Currently it has some usable timber for lumber, and of course we will use everything on it in the hugel beds once we get the swales made. The summary of our plan for the first part of land to use the swales is to install the them, plant fruit trees, understory plants, and then get those going for at least one year before bring the pigs into the area. Also, we plan on only about four pigs maximum on this two acre area. Not sure if we'll section it off into smaller paddocks but that would seem likely. The goal of feeding the pigs is that once the trees are producing we will be sharing much of the fruit with them. I think Sepp would be pleased.

Here's the question, eventually: in his Permaculture book, Sepp goes into how swales alone are fine for gently sloped terrain but on steeper terrain you'd be looking at forming terraces, then installing swales on the downhill side of those. Considering that, I'm interested in asking someone here who is experienced installing terraces and swales who knows what percentage grade is sort of a recommended practice for installing these terraces. I understand that each site is different as are soil and rock combinations. I should also include that where we're at here in Appalachia, zone 6b, we have a a lot of sandstone "tumbling loam". There is a lot of rock and while we get 45" of annual rainfall (excellent), the rocky soil drains pretty well. How well I couldn't tell you. Rainfall does run off at a certain point as it sometimes rains for d-a-y-s. A good problem to have. All the more incentive to build a good system for water retention. Really looking forward to it all.

Hugel/swale technique for fruit orchard with pigs in the understory

Thu, 01/01/2015 - 10:03
Hello,
A first post here. First an intro, then a plan summary, then a question. We have a small homestead (7 acres) that we have a cider orchard started on (Don't Quit Yer Day Job Orchard) and are finishing our house. What fun to raise children, build a house and try to farm at the same time. Really though we are blessed with all of it. We have several acres on a sloping hillside that was logged about fifteen years ago. Currently it has some usable timber for lumber, and of course we will use everything on it in the hugel beds once we get the swales made. The summary of our plan for the first part of land to use the swales is to install the them, plant fruit trees, understory plants, and then get those going for at least one year before bring the pigs into the area. Also, we plan on only about four pigs maximum on this two acre area. Not sure if we'll section it off into smaller paddocks but that would seem likely. The goal of feeding the pigs is that once the trees are producing we will be sharing much of the fruit with them. I think Sepp would be pleased.

Here's the question, eventually: in his Permaculture book, Sepp goes into how swales alone are fine for gently sloped terrain but on steeper terrain you'd be looking at forming terraces, then installing swales on the downhill side of those. Considering that, I'm interested in asking someone here who is experienced installing terraces and swales who knows what percentage grade is sort of a recommended practice for installing these terraces. I understand that each site is different as are soil and rock combinations. I should also include that where we're at here in Appalachia, zone 6b, we have a a lot of sandstone "tumbling loam". There is a lot of rock and while we get 45" of annual rainfall (excellent), the rocky soil drains pretty well. How well I couldn't tell you. Rainfall does run off at a certain point as it sometimes rains for d-a-y-s. A good problem to have. All the more incentive to build a good system for water retention. Really looking forward to it all.

Hugel/swale technique for fruit orchard with pigs in the understory

Thu, 01/01/2015 - 10:03
Hello,
A first post here. First an intro, then a plan summary, then a question. We have a small homestead (7 acres) that we have a cider orchard started on (Don't Quit Yer Day Job Orchard) and are finishing our house. What fun to raise children, build a house and try to farm at the same time. Really though we are blessed with all of it. We have several acres on a sloping hillside that was logged about fifteen years ago. Currently it has some usable timber for lumber, and of course we will use everything on it in the hugel beds once we get the swales made. The summary of our plan for the first part of land to use the swales is to install the them, plant fruit trees, understory plants, and then get those going for at least one year before bring the pigs into the area. Also, we plan on only about four pigs maximum on this two acre area. Not sure if we'll section it off into smaller paddocks but that would seem likely. The goal of feeding the pigs is that once the trees are producing we will be sharing much of the fruit with them. I think Sepp would be pleased.

Here's the question, eventually: in his Permaculture book, Sepp goes into how swales alone are fine for gently sloped terrain but on steeper terrain you'd be looking at forming terraces, then installing swales on the downhill side of those. Considering that, I'm interested in asking someone here who is experienced installing terraces and swales who knows what percentage grade is sort of a recommended practice for installing these terraces. I understand that each site is different as are soil and rock combinations. I should also include that where we're at here in Appalachia, zone 6b, we have a a lot of sandstone "tumbling loam". There is a lot of rock and while we get 45" of annual rainfall (excellent), the rocky soil drains pretty well. How well I couldn't tell you. Rainfall does run off at a certain point as it sometimes rains for d-a-y-s. A good problem to have. All the more incentive to build a good system for water retention. Really looking forward to it all.

EarthWalk - a Cocreative Residential Training Experience in the Foothils of N. Georgia

Thu, 12/18/2014 - 14:43
kaluna, our Healing and Learning Center is launching a new residential training experience this March called EarthWalk: Seeding Renewal. www.kalunacommunity.org/earthwalk. We invite you to join us for 6 months of Earth Centered living on the Old Whitestone Farm.

Come and find your feet on the kaluna EarthWalk; a circle of learners seeking to co-create an Earth centered cultural renewal. Through immersion in place-based village life, you will learn skills such as Eco-Farming, Permaculture, Primitive Living Skills, Herbalism, Natural Building, use of Appropriate Technology, Craft Production, inter-personal Community Development Skills and Mentoring. You will also engage in a process of introspective inquiry and experiential practice in order to deepen your understanding of self and its relationship to the natural world. Help us co-create something beautiful together.

EarthWalk - a Cocreative Residential Training Experience in the Foothils of N. Georgia

Thu, 12/18/2014 - 14:43
kaluna, our Healing and Learning Center is launching a new residential training experience this March called EarthWalk: Seeding Renewal. www.kalunacommunity.org/earthwalk. We invite you to join us for 6 months of Earth Centered living on the Old Whitestone Farm.

Come and find your feet on the kaluna EarthWalk; a circle of learners seeking to co-create an Earth centered cultural renewal. Through immersion in place-based village life, you will learn skills such as Eco-Farming, Permaculture, Primitive Living Skills, Herbalism, Natural Building, use of Appropriate Technology, Craft Production, inter-personal Community Development Skills and Mentoring. You will also engage in a process of introspective inquiry and experiential practice in order to deepen your understanding of self and its relationship to the natural world. Help us co-create something beautiful together.

EarthWalk - a Cocreative Residential Training Experience in the Foothils of N. Georgia

Thu, 12/18/2014 - 14:43
kaluna, our Healing and Learning Center is launching a new residential training experience this March called EarthWalk: Seeding Renewal. www.kalunacommunity.org/earthwalk. We invite you to join us for 6 months of Earth Centered living on the Old Whitestone Farm.

Come and find your feet on the kaluna EarthWalk; a circle of learners seeking to co-create an Earth centered cultural renewal. Through immersion in place-based village life, you will learn skills such as Eco-Farming, Permaculture, Primitive Living Skills, Herbalism, Natural Building, use of Appropriate Technology, Craft Production, inter-personal Community Development Skills and Mentoring. You will also engage in a process of introspective inquiry and experiential practice in order to deepen your understanding of self and its relationship to the natural world. Help us co-create something beautiful together.

Looking for the perfect home in KY

Fri, 11/21/2014 - 13:52
Howdy, ya'll.

My wife and I are looking to move and start a homestead and permaculture design in Kentucky, preferably near Lexington where her entire family lives. We'd like to live rural on no less than 5 acres, and preferably more than 10. We have two kids, ages 5 and 7, who go to public school. While we are considering homeschooling, we aren't commited to it, therefore we need to be in a good school district - which makes finding a town that has reasonably priced residences on several acres very difficult. For the most part it seems we can have land or we can have a good school, but getting both is tough unless you've got a million bucks to spend, which we don't. Jobs are not an issue, as I work at home for myself.

Two areas we've found that seem to meet our criteria are Danville and Versailles. Are there any other hidden gems that Kentuckians can point me to within a 50 mile radius of Lexington (and preferably much closer)?

Thanks!

Looking for the perfect home in KY

Fri, 11/21/2014 - 13:52
Howdy, ya'll.

My wife and I are looking to move and start a homestead and permaculture design in Kentucky, preferably near Lexington where her entire family lives. We'd like to live rural on no less than 5 acres, and preferably more than 10. We have two kids, ages 5 and 7, who go to public school. While we are considering homeschooling, we aren't commited to it, therefore we need to be in a good school district - which makes finding a town that has reasonably priced residences on several acres very difficult. For the most part it seems we can have land or we can have a good school, but getting both is tough unless you've got a million bucks to spend, which we don't. Jobs are not an issue, as I work at home for myself.

Two areas we've found that seem to meet our criteria are Danville and Versailles. Are there any other hidden gems that Kentuckians can point me to within a 50 mile radius of Lexington (and preferably much closer)?

Thanks!

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