Survival News

Back to the market!

Tiny Farm Blog - Tue, 06/03/2014 - 14:33

[From 24-May-2014] First day of the season at the outdoor farmers’ market. It’s not a particularly early start, the market goes outside on the first Saturday of May. In any case, here we are once again, this time around with lettuce mix and a bit of arugula from the unheated greenhouse, and baby kale from overwintered plants in the field. Nice day!

Back to the market!

Yellow Bell

Wild Harvests - Mon, 05/26/2014 - 17:16


The Methow Valley in north central Washington is a paradise of plants that explodes with color during the short period between the bitter cold winters and the dry dusty summers. For the last several years on mother’s day weekend, Katrina and I have traveled over the Cascade Crest to explore eastside edibles, hunt for morels, and participate in the Sunflower Run. The snowpack on Highway 20 was so deep this year that it took crews until May 8th to clear the road. Similarly, the wildflowers were delayed in their phenology. I had the pleasure of catching the Yellow Bells (Fritillaria pudica) in bloom for the first time in the Methow Valley, and got my first taste of this delicate but filling root vegetable.


Immature seed capsuleYellow Bell bulb with bulbletsIt is easy to see that Yellow Bell is closely related to two edible lilies found on the west side. Like Chocolate Lily (Fritillaria affinis) and Northern Riceroot (F. camschatcensis), Yellow Bell has a bulbous root that is surrounded by numerous bulblets that resemble grains of rice. These break off easily while being dug by bears, rodents, humans, and other animals, and are an important mechanism of plant regeneration. The large central bulb begins to push up a sprout when the first fall rains moisten forest openings in the pine forests, but this sprout stays far enough below the soil surface to avoid damage from the ensuing bite of winter cold. With a head start on the spring, the plant grows rapidly as soon as the snow has melted and takes advantage of the ample soil moisture to sprout an upright stem with 2-8 sporadically arranged narrow leaves, and 1-3 hanging bell-shaped flowers that emerge yellow and age to a bright orange. The petals blush and fall away quickly after the flowers have been pollinated (hense the species epithet pudica meaning "shy" in Latin) and the stems straighten to produce upright cylindrical seed pods that split into three chambers and disperse flattened seeds.

Yellow Bell grows in shrub-steppe and mixed coniferous forests at low to mid elevations. They can be found east of the Cascade crest from Kamloops Lake in southern British Columbia southward to the Klamath Mountains and Modoc Plateau in northern California. They are also found sporadically throughout the Rocky Mountains south of Kimberly BC to northwest Colorado. The eastward range extends through Montana and a few places in North Dakota.


Yellow Bells are probably a traditional food among all the Native American tribes that share the plant's range. The Nlaka’pamux (Thompson), Shuswap, Syilx (Okanogan), Spokan, Paiute, Blackfoot, and Ute ate the bulbs fresh, steamed, or boiled (Moerman). The Nlaka’pamux and Sylix welcomed the flowers as an early sign of spring, and immediately collected the bulbs (Teit 1930) along with those of Glacier Lily (Erythronium grandiflorum); these roots were often steamed in an earthen pit for 15 minutes and then sun dried on mats for use throughout the rest of the year (Turner et al. 1980; Turner et al. 1990).
Mt. Potato (left) and Yellow Bell (right)Challenged by my camping companions to produce a wild food meal, I set out with my diggings stick to locate some Yellow Bells. I found them growing abundantly in an open Ponderosa Pine and Douglas Fir forest with Mountain Potatoes (Claytonia lanceolata). Since they are relatively shallow rooted plants, I was able to dig both species out of the gravelly soil quickly. To ensure future harvests, I replanted the flat rootlet-covered disc at the base of each Yellow Bell bulb as well as all the small bulblets that easily broke from the main bulb. After 45 minutes, I had about 15 Yellow Bell bulbs and 50 Mountain Potato tubers- enough for a meal. Yellow Bell bulbs are the shape of pattypan squash and have a starchy bland flavor when raw. I boiled them with the Mountain Potato tubers, roasted sausage, and some wild rice that I had brought along, and seasoned the broth with freshly harvested Bare-stem Desert Parsley (Lomatium nudicaule) leaves. Cooked, Yellow Bell bulbs are slightly sweeter than raw and have a smoother, corn starch texture. Though I only had time to harvest enough for a single serving, the soup was a hit and everyone got a taste.
A lineup of Yellow Bell bulbs, the one on the left still has the basal disc attached
Yellow Bells have a similar nutrient profile to a potato but have 50 percent more protein, six times as much calcium, and nearly 30 times more iron (Norton et al. 1984). At 64 calories per 100g fresh weight, Yellow Bell bulbs have more caloric value than Common Camas (61 cal/100g) but less than Northern Riceroot (98 cal/100g). Yellow Bells are slightly higher in fat and much higher in calcium but lower in carbohydrates than both Common Camas and Northern Riceroot (Kuhnlein and Turner 1991).

Sources:Biota of North America Program, North American Vascular Flora, North American Plant Atlas, Fritillaria pudica distribution
Calflora, Taxon Report 3641, Fritillaria pudica
Consortium of Pacific Northwest Herbaria, Fritillaria pudica
Kuhnlein, Harriet V. and Nancy J. Turner 1991. “Traditional Plant Foods of Canadian Indigenous Peoples, Nutrition, Botany, and Use.” Food and Nutrition in History and Anthropology, Volume 8, Gordon and Breach Publishers.
Moerman, Dan. “Native American Ethnobotany” University of Michigan Herbarium.
Norton, Helen H., Eugen S. Hunn, C. S. Martinsen, and P. B. Keely 1984. “Vegetable Food Products of the Foraging Economies of the Pacific Northwest.” Ecology of Food and Nutrition, Volume 14, pages 219-228.
Teit, James 1930. “Ethnobotany of the Thompson Indians of British Columbia.” Annual report of the Bureau of American Ethnology to the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, US Government Printing Office, Washington DC.
Turner, Nancy J. Randy Bouchard, and Dorothy Kennedy 1980. “Ethnobotany of the Okanagan-Colville Indians of British Columbia and Washington.” Occasional Paper Series No. 21, British Columbia Provincial Museum, Victoria BC.
Turner, Nancy J., Laurence C. Thompson, M. Terry Thompson, and Annie Z. York 1990. “Thompson Ethnobotany, Knowledge and Usage of Plants by the Thompson Indians of British Columbia.” Royal British Columbia Museum Memoir No. 3. Victoria, BC.
© Wild Harvests 2011-2012. Wild Harvests by T. Abe Lloyd (http://www.arcadianabe.blogspot.com) is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License. Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at http://www.blogger.com/profile/15355814866987311366.

Chicken-Friendly Towns in WV

Appalachian Permies - Fri, 05/23/2014 - 10:57
Hi there! My husband and I live in the Kanawha Valley and want to relocate (new place, same area). In our current town, there is an ordinance against chickens. We have been looking at places outside city limits but there doesn't seem to be much on the market right now, so I am trying to expand our search.

Does anyone know of any towns in the Kanawha Valley that don't have ordinances that preclude chicken ownership?

Thanks!

Chicken-Friendly Towns in WV

Appalachian Permies - Fri, 05/23/2014 - 10:57
Hi there! My husband and I live in the Kanawha Valley and want to relocate (new place, same area). In our current town, there is an ordinance against chickens. We have been looking at places outside city limits but there doesn't seem to be much on the market right now, so I am trying to expand our search.

Does anyone know of any towns in the Kanawha Valley that don't have ordinances that preclude chicken ownership?

Thanks!

Chicken-Friendly Towns in WV

Appalachian Permies - Fri, 05/23/2014 - 10:57
Hi there! My husband and I live in the Kanawha Valley and want to relocate (new place, same area). In our current town, there is an ordinance against chickens. We have been looking at places outside city limits but there doesn't seem to be much on the market right now, so I am trying to expand our search.

Does anyone know of any towns in the Kanawha Valley that don't have ordinances that preclude chicken ownership?

Thanks!

April Showers Bring May Foraging

Kentucky Forager - Tue, 05/20/2014 - 18:32

Hey everyone! We got a bit of a late start to our foraging season this year. We are currently in the middle of a move, and for the last few weeks everything else has been put on the back burner.

I find that May is the best time for foraging. There is a bevy of edibles and it’s not yet too hot, nor too overgrown to access them. So without further adieu, here are just a few of those lush May edibles.

Wild Violets

The flowers aren’t the only edible part of the violet, the leaves are also a nice salad green.

Wild Violets

 

 

 

Smilax shoots

Smilax

While the thorny smilax plant seems an unlikely edible, the tender new growth is crisp and delicious. You can eat it raw or cooked. I’ve only eaten it raw, but I imagine it would be a great addition to a stir fry. Almost like bean sprouts, but with a more distinct flavor.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mature smilax bona-nox

 

The root of the smilax plant can also be cooked and eaten, or used to make sarsaparilla. (Smilax is the original source of sarsaparilla, although modern day sarsaparilla is made from artificial flavors.)

It also produces tiny black berries that won’t be edible until mid winter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Milkweed Shoots

Milkweed is somewhat controversial as an edible for a couple of reasons. As I mentioned last summer in my post about milkweed, it is the primary food source for the monarch caterpillar, and due to mass die-offs in the monarch butterfly population, some people are hesitant to pick it. I just say stick to the 10% rule. The field I pick from is going to be mowed anyway so it’s not much of a moral dilemma for me. The other concern is that the sap can cause skin irritation and stomach upset in some people. To avoid this, never eat milkweed raw, always parboil it to remove the sap before eating. They may need to be boiled in 2-3 changes of water to remove bitterness. The tender shoots can then be steamed or roasted and eaten like asparagus, the buds, flowers and young pods can also be eaten, but it wont be to that stage for a few more weeks.

 

Be careful not to confuse milkweed with it’s toxic lookalike, dogbane. Not only are they difficult to tell apart, but they often grow in the same places at the same time. The underside of milkweeds leaves are fuzzier, and it has a hollow, green stem. Dogbane will have a solid stem that is white on the inside.

Toxic Dogbane (left) and Milkweed (right)

Wild Grape Leaves

When young, grape leaves are tender and edible. You can steam or sauté them, or use them for making dolmas just as you would with domestic grape leaves. If you aren’t a fan of bitter greens, you may want to pass on the grape leaves and just wait for the fruit. Mature grape leaves can be used when fermenting pickles to keep them crisp.

WIld Grape

 

 

Appalachian Wildcraft

Appalachian Permies - Sun, 05/18/2014 - 00:35
I happened to stumble across a few good wildcraft videos from this region and thought I'd share.



I know Appalachia has some great wildcrafting opportunities. I really really am hoping to stay in my familiar Puget Trough Cascadia, but if that's not possible I have had an offer to take management of a property and try to start a business out of it in Gilmer County WV I am seriously considering.

Appalachian Wildcraft

Appalachian Permies - Sun, 05/18/2014 - 00:35
I happened to stumble across a few good wildcraft videos from this region and thought I'd share.



I know Appalachia has some great wildcrafting opportunities. I really really am hoping to stay in my familiar Puget Trough Cascadia, but if that's not possible I have had an offer to take management of a property and try to start a business out of it in Gilmer County WV I am seriously considering.

Appalachian Wildcraft

Appalachian Permies - Sun, 05/18/2014 - 00:35
I happened to stumble across a few good wildcraft videos from this region and thought I'd share.



I know Appalachia has some great wildcrafting opportunities. I really really am hoping to stay in my familiar Puget Trough Cascadia, but if that's not possible I have had an offer to take management of a property and try to start a business out of it in Gilmer County WV I am seriously considering.

Blackberries, A Forager’s Companion

Eat the Weeds - Wed, 05/07/2014 - 01:13

The center core remains when blackberries are picked making them slightly bitter. Photo by Green Deane

Blackberries: Robust Rubus, Food & Weed

Anyone who forages will eventually collect blackberries and blackberry scratches. These aggregate fruit are among the best-known berries in North American, if not the world.

As a kid I can remember collecting wild raspberries long before wild blackberries, though I don’t know why. Blackberries are standard foraging fair (see my article about Dewberries.)  What most people don’t know is that blackberries are a two-year plant, some say three years. The first year it sends up a tall cane, replete with thorns. The next year it flowers and has blackberries then dies. Some would add that the cane stays on another year and with its thorns to protect the patch. (I should add though that there are some naturally thornless blackberries.)

Ripe blackberries can be yellow or red but usually they are black.

Blackberry leaves were in the official U.S. pharmacopoeia for a long time treating digestive problems, particularly diarrhea. Their dried leaves make an excellent tea even when you’re healthy. We presume blackberries have been eaten for thousands of years by native American Indians and used medicinally. The ancient Greeks considered the species good for ailments of the mouth and throat and for treating gout. Interestingly blackberries were found in the stomach content the Haraldskaer Woman, an iron age bog body found in Denmark in 1835 but killed around 500 BC. Her last meal was millet and blackberries. Scholars think her death was probably a religious ritual. The millet would have been standard Iron Age fare. Maybe the blackberries were a special treat. Those blackberries would have also put her execution in early summer, perhaps to ensure a good fall harvest by appeasing an agricultural god.

For all their antioxidants and vitamins blackberries will mold within a couple of days of picking if not refrigerated. Do not wash until time of use because that, too, promotes mold. They ripen around June in the south, July in the north, give or take a few weeks. Locally they can be ripe by early May or totally past season by the Fourth of July. Picked unripe berries will not ripen. Black berries are also a good source of potassium, phosphorus, iron, and calcium. The seeds have Omega 3 and 6 fatty acids.

Insects and wildlife like the blackberry as well. This includes honeybees, bumblebees, Little Carpenter bees, Nomadine Cuckoo bees, Mason bees, Green Metallic bees (my favorite) flies, wasps, small to medium-sized butterflies, skippers, hairstreaks, and several species of moths. Fowl like the berries such as the Greater Prairie Chicken, Wild Turkey, Bobwhite, Ring-Necked Pheasant, and various mammals from the bear to rabbit. In fact I recently saw a rabbit nibble on blackberry along a local bike trail.

In the rose family, just how many species of blackberries there are is anyone’s educated or non-educated guess. Some argue a few species with a lot of varieties and others argue for 250 or so species. Generally, ones that crawl are in one group and those that form canes are in another group. Then there are numerous unintentional and intentional hybrids, such as the Loganberry, Youngberry and the Boysenberry. Even the raspberry is a Rubus. The name, Rubus (ROU-bus) is the Dead Latin name for the blackberry and it means red hair.  There are several native local species. R. argutus, R. cuneifolius, R. flagellaris and R. trivialis (see the above Dewberry entry.) The ones I harvest annually I think are escaped cultivars in that they produce large, sweet berries consistently year to year.

Russia grows most of the world’s commercial blackberries, some 24 percent. Next is Serbia and Montegegro at 23%, the United States with 13%, Poland 11% and Germany 7 percent. Blackberries are native to every continent except Australia and Antarctica. However, in Tasmania and Australia the species are officially noxious weeds. Think about that: And edible plant on the noxious list. Must not be too hungry in those countries. In 2003 the Blackberry, Rubus occidentalis, became the official fruit of Alabama.

Lastly there is one interesting note about aggregate fruit. At least one expert says 99.99 percent of aggregate fruit are edible (such as blackberries, mulberries, logan berries et cetera.) Personally I would have liked to have seen listed the non-edible .01 percent.

Green Deane’s “Itemized” Plant Profile

IDENTIFICATION:

A woody shrub with canes that grow up but often bend over sometimes re-rooting. The canes grow the first year and fruits during the second year, then they die. Canes are 3-6′ tall; green at the growing tip, elsewhere brown or reddish brown with stiff prickles, straight or slightly curved. Can be am inch through at the base. Leaves alternate, usually trifoliate or palmately compound; long petioles. Leaflets up to 4″ long and 3″ across; can be twice as long as wide. Leaflet is usually oval with coarse, doubly serrate edges; may have scattered white hairs on the upper surface, lower surface light green and hairy.  Flowers, to an inch across, have 5 white petals and 5 green sepals with pointed tips; Petals longer than sepals, rather rounded, often wrinkly. Numerous stamens with yellow anthers. Blooms late spring to early summer for a month; little or no fragrance. Drupes, actually aggregate fruit, develop later in the summer;  ¾” long and 1/3″ across,size varies with moisture levels. Berries at first white or green eventually turn red then black. Seedy, sweet.

TIME OF YEAR:

Depending on climate, spring to late summer

ENVIRONMENT:

Full sun, neither too wet or too dry, mesic conditions

METHOD OF PREPARATION:

Numerous:; Fresh, frozen, canned, used for wine, making ice cream, juice, pies, jelly, jam, and best of all when eaten fresh on the trail.  Dry leaves can be used for tea. Leaves can be dried as is or fermented which improves the flavor significantly. Fermented or not they should be dried. Young shoots can be peeled and boiled in one or more changes of water. Running the fresh leaves through the rollers of a pasta machine is a good way to crush them for fermentation.

Inspiration on the Path of Herbalism

Nettlejuice - Tue, 05/06/2014 - 07:27
"What would the world be, once bereft
Of wet and wildness? Let them be left,
Oh let them be left, wildness and wet;
Long live the weeds and the wilderness yet."

Gerard Manley Hopkins

I've always been drawn to the weeds and the wilderness, as Hopkins puts it. But then, to most young children, there is no distinction between weeds and wilderness. For a child recognizes the wild in all it's forms, from the large and impending wood lot at the end of the lane, to the dandelions bursting through a crack of asphalt in the parking lot. All is Nature in it's indescribable, but wholly palpable (to a child) form. The wild doesn't ask for permission, doesn't recognize rules, isn't proper, doesn't grow in rows, doesn't respect construction. In other words, the wild hasn't been tamed, obviously. But I think that is why it is so easily seen by children. Children, who have not yet been fully trained in the ways of society, i.e. tamed, find a delight in the wilds wherever they find it. But the more we grow, the more the adults try to school us in the ways of the world, the more we lose this connection, this ability to see the intelligence in the wild things around us, and the more we lose a sense of kinship with them.

I'm thinking about all this because recently another herbalist, in helping me find inspiration for a blog post, suggested the question, "What kind of herbalist are you?" In pondering this, I began to think about what I love about working with the plants, and then about what attracted me to this path in the first place, and then to that initial spark that first called my attention back to the wild things after many years of disconnection, and how magical that was for me. And then I realized that that spark that woke me up, that grabbed my attention years ago and reawakened in me a thing that had been asleep since childhood, that spark is what keeps me on this path, and what drives me to work in the way that I do. Sometimes in our lives we have moments of crystallization, when something breaks through our consciousness and suddenly we get it, that is we get something. And even though we can't really articulate to our fellow humans around us what it is that we suddenly "get", we are changed in that moment, and able to see things we previously could not. This is how it was for me when, in my early 20's, I saw the wild all around me as an ever presence benevolent force that I was somehow a part of. And in that realization, the flood of childhood memories of a time where this knowing was just a part of who I was, who we all are before we are taught otherwise, came rushing in.

For me, this awakening was sparked by the weeds. I had been studying medicinal herbs (that's a very technical and society-approved term for wild plants that can help us heal) and at some point it began to dawn on me that many of the offending things that we call "weeds" and love to complain about and pull (even if we throw our back out) and spray with poison that makes our children sick and really have  downright declared war against because we loath them so, many of these plants could also be called medicinal herbs. What? 
I started to look at my back yard differently. I started to wonder what was really going on there. And I started to question that weird distinction our culture seems to have made so long ago between the wild and the civilized. I started to wonder, as I hiked through the preserved patches of forests outside of town, why we separate ourselves from the wild (or try to), with us over here, and the "preserve" over there. Over the years I've come to understand that, whatever the reason for the initial separation, the result is a whole society of humans who are so disconnected from the Nature they are a part of, they have no problem at all in destroying it. There is no remorse in  chopping down trees or poisoning rivers. We've gotten quite good at it. But for those who have that connection intact, these acts are traumatic to witness.

When my oldest son was five years old, the road crews were trimming the trees along the power lines on our road. When they got to our house, they began to trim some of the limbs on the big silver maple by our driveway. My son began screaming and crying. I could not calm him down and he became so enrages he started throwing sticks at the crew. I picked him up and brought him inside, where I listened to his pain. They had not asked permission before they started cutting that living tree that he had known all his life, that he still recognized a kinship with. I held him and we cried together. I tried to explain to him that they meant no harm and were only trimming branches away from the wires, but in my heart I knew my son was right. The problem was not the tree, but the fact that to those workers the tree was just a thing to be trimmed, they had lost that connection.

And so this is why I work with the plants. It is a way for me to work every day to rekindle that connection, for me to try to preserve it in my children, and to try, in any way I can, to rekindle it in those around me. This is why I chose to teach (instead of say, become a clinical herbalist), and why I teach outside, in the garden, with the living plants. I want to inspire that awakening in people, I want to open their eyes and their hearts to the wonder that exists right in their back yards, in the cracks in the pavement. I want them to taste calamus root, to feel mullein, to smell meadowsweet, and to see the patterns and geometries of these incredible plants. And then, I want them to begin to shift their perception about their relationship to this green world. It may sound like a grand goal, but when someone suddenly understands the value of dandelion and plantain in their lives, when they can become grateful for their gifts, the shift has begun. 

And when I get ladies coming back to my classes and relating stories about telling their husbands not to mow over there, or weed over here, my heart is happy. Yes, I want to help folks with their eczema and digestive issues, but healing that disconnect is where my real passion dwells. It is what drives me and keeps me on this path. It is what inspires me. I love it.

And once one begins to accept the possibility that those "weeds" growing around us might not be all that bad, well maybe that will open the door to connecting with Nature at large, perhaps even beginning to heal our kinship with her. Well, we've got to start somewhere.









James River crude oil spill happened on 4/31/2014- DON'T DRINK THE TAPWATER

Appalachian Permies - Thu, 05/01/2014 - 09:09
richmond, va, is needing a good laugh about now- last night we found out some CSX trains in Lynchberg derailed and dumped 50,000+ gallons of crude oil down the James River, which is a huge water supply for cities all downstream. (not to forget all the wildlife on the river who are being poisoned or were burned to death when the river caught fire)

If you live around the James River, please be careful drinking any water. Well water should be okay, but anything from the tap has oil residue in it, so just drink bottled water or well-filtered rain water. here's an article to share:

http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2014/04/30/3432820/train-derailment-lynchburg/

http://www.timesdispatch.com/news/state-regional/train-carrying-crude-oil-derails-in-downtown-lynchburg/article_ca91041c-d096-11e3-ae9b-0017a43b2370.html

please let your friends in VA//Appalachian//Piedmont region know about this if they haven't already heard. thanks-

-jude

James River crude oil spill happened on 4/31/2014- DON'T DRINK THE TAPWATER

Appalachian Permies - Thu, 05/01/2014 - 09:09
richmond, va, is needing a good laugh about now- last night we found out some CSX trains in Lynchberg derailed and dumped 50,000+ gallons of crude oil down the James River, which is a huge water supply for cities all downstream. (not to forget all the wildlife on the river who are being poisoned or were burned to death when the river caught fire)

If you live around the James River, please be careful drinking any water. Well water should be okay, but anything from the tap has oil residue in it, so just drink bottled water or well-filtered rain water. here's an article to share:

http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2014/04/30/3432820/train-derailment-lynchburg/

http://www.timesdispatch.com/news/state-regional/train-carrying-crude-oil-derails-in-downtown-lynchburg/article_ca91041c-d096-11e3-ae9b-0017a43b2370.html

please let your friends in VA//Appalachian//Piedmont region know about this if they haven't already heard. thanks-

-jude

James River crude oil spill happened on 4/31/2014- DON'T DRINK THE TAPWATER

Appalachian Permies - Thu, 05/01/2014 - 09:09
richmond, va, is needing a good laugh about now- last night we found out some CSX trains in Lynchberg derailed and dumped 50,000+ gallons of crude oil down the James River, which is a huge water supply for cities all downstream. (not to forget all the wildlife on the river who are being poisoned or were burned to death when the river caught fire)

If you live around the James River, please be careful drinking any water. Well water should be okay, but anything from the tap has oil residue in it, so just drink bottled water or well-filtered rain water. here's an article to share:

http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2014/04/30/3432820/train-derailment-lynchburg/

http://www.timesdispatch.com/news/state-regional/train-carrying-crude-oil-derails-in-downtown-lynchburg/article_ca91041c-d096-11e3-ae9b-0017a43b2370.html

please let your friends in VA//Appalachian//Piedmont region know about this if they haven't already heard. thanks-

-jude

Permaculture Design Certificate Course in Hot Springs, NC

Appalachian Permies - Mon, 04/28/2014 - 11:19
Permaculture Design Certificate Course: Designing Cultural Ecosystems
Earn your internationally recognized Permaculture Design Certification during this 13 day residential course that integrates real-world design, homestead skill building and deep nature connection.
Offered by Spiral Ridge Permaculture Click on Spiral Ridge PDCfor more details.
Lead Instructor, Cliff Davis with Jennifer Albanese, Jessie Smith, Jason Hurd, Goodheart Brown, Phillip Kendall & David Kendall.

We need to change our inner landscapes. The culture of our minds. We need vision. We need a positive, solution focused mindset. We need to be inspired and we need to take action. We need to regenerate and heal our landscapes, our personal lives, our relationship with nature and our culture & communities. We need resiliency training. We need to learn how to connect with nature so we may learn how to mimic it in the design of our present and future. That’s what this course is all about.

For 13 days you will be immersing yourself in an intensive, educational retreat. Take time out of your life to stay on a beautiful farm along the Appalachian Trail, learning tools, guiding principles, and strategies to create lush productive landscapes, reduce your energy use, and create more stability and security for you and your loved ones. You will create a village, and find community with a group of caring individuals sharing the knowledge and enthusiasm that come from joining forces and focusing on solutions. All levels are welcome. Whether you are new to these ideas and wondering where this path will take you or if you have been in an a related field and need new inspiration.



Our program contains the internationally recognized 72 hour Permaculture Design Certificate Course curriculum, but we are ready to give you even more value. You will receive all of the benefits of attending a typical PDC, but you will also get…

→Over 100+ hours of instruction; live stream talks, lectures, slideshows, site tours, exercises, games, facilitated group discussions and more.
→Field trips to sites incorporating permaculture practices.
→Hands-on skill building classes with practical exercises and implementations.
→An opportunity to learn from professional designers, farmers, homesteaders & community organizers that are actively putting the design process to work, not just teaching about it.
→In depth study and utilization of the Ecological Design Process. Most Permaculture Design Courses do not teach the Ecological Design Process. This professional process will give you a step by step approach to applying the principles of permaculture. Knowing this process will give you greater confidence to move forward with a design. You will be taught how to create holistic goals, read the landscape and use the scale of permanence to organize data and develop a design to meet those goals. Time to work in teams to experience the design process from beginning to end, presenting to the rest of the class at the conclusion of this course.
→A class entitled, Graphic Tools for Permaculture Design Drawings. Skills to be acquired: Plan graphic methods for representing: landform and topography, rock, water, vegetation, structures, roads and pathways, general use areas, property/utility lines and other linear representations, abstract diagrammatic methods for site analysis, labeling systems, title block, use of scale. A personal set of tools to be provided as part of overall fees) will include: lead and color pencils, felt tip black pens and markers. Other tools will be demonstrated.
→Plenty of time for questions, discussions, and individualized attention from the instructors to dive deeper into a topic or discuss personal projects you are working on.
→Teaching that is catered to all levels of experience. Beginning students will find the course gives them a comprehensive understanding of permaculture and how to apply it and the inspiration and resources to take it further, while advanced permaculture students and certificate holders come away with a more in depth understanding of the ecological design process, deep nature connection, advanced strategies, and more.
→A curriculum that is designed as an ecosystem, in and of, itself. We incorporate the scale of permanence to organize class schedules. The 8 Shields model dictates our daily rhythms. We integrate different learning modalities to appeal to the different types of learners. Design practice throughout the whole course, rather than just at the end, to build skills and confidence as well as learn to cooperate in teams.
→Introduced to complimentary practices, such as Holistic Management, whole farm planning, Keyline and Broadscale Design and the 8 Shields Model.
→Nature Connection – Time for the core routines of deep nature connection as taught in Jon Young’s work in the Art of Mentoring.
→People Connection – social gatherings in the evenings with story and music.
→Full immersion for 13 days. We have found that shorter PDC’s leave the students short changed. We like to take our time covering the material, with plenty of time for hand-on activities, group process and design, community building and fun. We have also found that some down time facilitates a better learning environment.
→Fully catered meals (omnivorous OR vegetarian, with gluten free options) so you may focus on your time on course activities.
→Camping facilities on a beautiful mountain farm
→A complimentary Spiral Ridge Permaculture T-shirt at graduation
→Discounts on future courses and the possibility of earning credit or cash by referring others to our future PDC’s.

Permaculture Design Certificate Course in Hot Springs, NC

Appalachian Permies - Mon, 04/28/2014 - 11:19
Permaculture Design Certificate Course: Designing Cultural Ecosystems
Earn your internationally recognized Permaculture Design Certification during this 13 day residential course that integrates real-world design, homestead skill building and deep nature connection.
Offered by Spiral Ridge Permaculture Click on Spiral Ridge PDCfor more details.
Lead Instructor, Cliff Davis with Jennifer Albanese, Jessie Smith, Jason Hurd, Goodheart Brown, Phillip Kendall & David Kendall.

We need to change our inner landscapes. The culture of our minds. We need vision. We need a positive, solution focused mindset. We need to be inspired and we need to take action. We need to regenerate and heal our landscapes, our personal lives, our relationship with nature and our culture & communities. We need resiliency training. We need to learn how to connect with nature so we may learn how to mimic it in the design of our present and future. That’s what this course is all about.

For 13 days you will be immersing yourself in an intensive, educational retreat. Take time out of your life to stay on a beautiful farm along the Appalachian Trail, learning tools, guiding principles, and strategies to create lush productive landscapes, reduce your energy use, and create more stability and security for you and your loved ones. You will create a village, and find community with a group of caring individuals sharing the knowledge and enthusiasm that come from joining forces and focusing on solutions. All levels are welcome. Whether you are new to these ideas and wondering where this path will take you or if you have been in an a related field and need new inspiration.



Our program contains the internationally recognized 72 hour Permaculture Design Certificate Course curriculum, but we are ready to give you even more value. You will receive all of the benefits of attending a typical PDC, but you will also get…

→Over 100+ hours of instruction; live stream talks, lectures, slideshows, site tours, exercises, games, facilitated group discussions and more.
→Field trips to sites incorporating permaculture practices.
→Hands-on skill building classes with practical exercises and implementations.
→An opportunity to learn from professional designers, farmers, homesteaders & community organizers that are actively putting the design process to work, not just teaching about it.
→In depth study and utilization of the Ecological Design Process. Most Permaculture Design Courses do not teach the Ecological Design Process. This professional process will give you a step by step approach to applying the principles of permaculture. Knowing this process will give you greater confidence to move forward with a design. You will be taught how to create holistic goals, read the landscape and use the scale of permanence to organize data and develop a design to meet those goals. Time to work in teams to experience the design process from beginning to end, presenting to the rest of the class at the conclusion of this course.
→A class entitled, Graphic Tools for Permaculture Design Drawings. Skills to be acquired: Plan graphic methods for representing: landform and topography, rock, water, vegetation, structures, roads and pathways, general use areas, property/utility lines and other linear representations, abstract diagrammatic methods for site analysis, labeling systems, title block, use of scale. A personal set of tools to be provided as part of overall fees) will include: lead and color pencils, felt tip black pens and markers. Other tools will be demonstrated.
→Plenty of time for questions, discussions, and individualized attention from the instructors to dive deeper into a topic or discuss personal projects you are working on.
→Teaching that is catered to all levels of experience. Beginning students will find the course gives them a comprehensive understanding of permaculture and how to apply it and the inspiration and resources to take it further, while advanced permaculture students and certificate holders come away with a more in depth understanding of the ecological design process, deep nature connection, advanced strategies, and more.
→A curriculum that is designed as an ecosystem, in and of, itself. We incorporate the scale of permanence to organize class schedules. The 8 Shields model dictates our daily rhythms. We integrate different learning modalities to appeal to the different types of learners. Design practice throughout the whole course, rather than just at the end, to build skills and confidence as well as learn to cooperate in teams.
→Introduced to complimentary practices, such as Holistic Management, whole farm planning, Keyline and Broadscale Design and the 8 Shields Model.
→Nature Connection – Time for the core routines of deep nature connection as taught in Jon Young’s work in the Art of Mentoring.
→People Connection – social gatherings in the evenings with story and music.
→Full immersion for 13 days. We have found that shorter PDC’s leave the students short changed. We like to take our time covering the material, with plenty of time for hand-on activities, group process and design, community building and fun. We have also found that some down time facilitates a better learning environment.
→Fully catered meals (omnivorous OR vegetarian, with gluten free options) so you may focus on your time on course activities.
→Camping facilities on a beautiful mountain farm
→A complimentary Spiral Ridge Permaculture T-shirt at graduation
→Discounts on future courses and the possibility of earning credit or cash by referring others to our future PDC’s.

Permaculture Design Certificate Course in Hot Springs, NC

Appalachian Permies - Mon, 04/28/2014 - 11:19
Permaculture Design Certificate Course: Designing Cultural Ecosystems
Earn your internationally recognized Permaculture Design Certification during this 13 day residential course that integrates real-world design, homestead skill building and deep nature connection.
Offered by Spiral Ridge Permaculture Click on Spiral Ridge PDCfor more details.
Lead Instructor, Cliff Davis with Jennifer Albanese, Jessie Smith, Jason Hurd, Goodheart Brown, Phillip Kendall & David Kendall.

We need to change our inner landscapes. The culture of our minds. We need vision. We need a positive, solution focused mindset. We need to be inspired and we need to take action. We need to regenerate and heal our landscapes, our personal lives, our relationship with nature and our culture & communities. We need resiliency training. We need to learn how to connect with nature so we may learn how to mimic it in the design of our present and future. That’s what this course is all about.

For 13 days you will be immersing yourself in an intensive, educational retreat. Take time out of your life to stay on a beautiful farm along the Appalachian Trail, learning tools, guiding principles, and strategies to create lush productive landscapes, reduce your energy use, and create more stability and security for you and your loved ones. You will create a village, and find community with a group of caring individuals sharing the knowledge and enthusiasm that come from joining forces and focusing on solutions. All levels are welcome. Whether you are new to these ideas and wondering where this path will take you or if you have been in an a related field and need new inspiration.



Our program contains the internationally recognized 72 hour Permaculture Design Certificate Course curriculum, but we are ready to give you even more value. You will receive all of the benefits of attending a typical PDC, but you will also get…

→Over 100+ hours of instruction; live stream talks, lectures, slideshows, site tours, exercises, games, facilitated group discussions and more.
→Field trips to sites incorporating permaculture practices.
→Hands-on skill building classes with practical exercises and implementations.
→An opportunity to learn from professional designers, farmers, homesteaders & community organizers that are actively putting the design process to work, not just teaching about it.
→In depth study and utilization of the Ecological Design Process. Most Permaculture Design Courses do not teach the Ecological Design Process. This professional process will give you a step by step approach to applying the principles of permaculture. Knowing this process will give you greater confidence to move forward with a design. You will be taught how to create holistic goals, read the landscape and use the scale of permanence to organize data and develop a design to meet those goals. Time to work in teams to experience the design process from beginning to end, presenting to the rest of the class at the conclusion of this course.
→A class entitled, Graphic Tools for Permaculture Design Drawings. Skills to be acquired: Plan graphic methods for representing: landform and topography, rock, water, vegetation, structures, roads and pathways, general use areas, property/utility lines and other linear representations, abstract diagrammatic methods for site analysis, labeling systems, title block, use of scale. A personal set of tools to be provided as part of overall fees) will include: lead and color pencils, felt tip black pens and markers. Other tools will be demonstrated.
→Plenty of time for questions, discussions, and individualized attention from the instructors to dive deeper into a topic or discuss personal projects you are working on.
→Teaching that is catered to all levels of experience. Beginning students will find the course gives them a comprehensive understanding of permaculture and how to apply it and the inspiration and resources to take it further, while advanced permaculture students and certificate holders come away with a more in depth understanding of the ecological design process, deep nature connection, advanced strategies, and more.
→A curriculum that is designed as an ecosystem, in and of, itself. We incorporate the scale of permanence to organize class schedules. The 8 Shields model dictates our daily rhythms. We integrate different learning modalities to appeal to the different types of learners. Design practice throughout the whole course, rather than just at the end, to build skills and confidence as well as learn to cooperate in teams.
→Introduced to complimentary practices, such as Holistic Management, whole farm planning, Keyline and Broadscale Design and the 8 Shields Model.
→Nature Connection – Time for the core routines of deep nature connection as taught in Jon Young’s work in the Art of Mentoring.
→People Connection – social gatherings in the evenings with story and music.
→Full immersion for 13 days. We have found that shorter PDC’s leave the students short changed. We like to take our time covering the material, with plenty of time for hand-on activities, group process and design, community building and fun. We have also found that some down time facilitates a better learning environment.
→Fully catered meals (omnivorous OR vegetarian, with gluten free options) so you may focus on your time on course activities.
→Camping facilities on a beautiful mountain farm
→A complimentary Spiral Ridge Permaculture T-shirt at graduation
→Discounts on future courses and the possibility of earning credit or cash by referring others to our future PDC’s.

Field to Fork Festival - Paint Lick, KY

Appalachian Permies - Thu, 04/17/2014 - 19:08
The date (May 10th) for the Field to Fork Festival in Paint Lick Kentucky, near Berea, is quickly approaching.

http://fieldtoforkfestival.blogspot.com/

Field to Fork Festival - Paint Lick, KY

Appalachian Permies - Thu, 04/17/2014 - 19:08
The date (May 10th) for the Field to Fork Festival in Paint Lick Kentucky, near Berea, is quickly approaching.

http://fieldtoforkfestival.blogspot.com/

Field to Fork Festival - Paint Lick, KY

Appalachian Permies - Thu, 04/17/2014 - 19:08
The date (May 10th) for the Field to Fork Festival in Paint Lick Kentucky, near Berea, is quickly approaching.

http://fieldtoforkfestival.blogspot.com/

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